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Virginia Military Institute -- Cadet life -- 1860-1869

 Subject
Subject Source: Local sources

Found in 188 Collections and/or Records:

Letter to Fannie Stanard, 1863 February 20

 Digital Image
Identifier: https://digitalcollections.vmi.edu/digital/collection/p15821coll11/id/917

Letter to Fanny Stanard, 1864 March 13

 Item
Scope and Contents Written from VMI, Lexington, Virginia. Letter regards receipt of a package, family matters, "greening" of a cadet, and cadet life.

Letter to Fanny Stanard, 1864 March 13

 Digital Image
Identifier: https://digitalcollections.vmi.edu/digital/collection/p15821coll11/id/958

Letter to James Henry Reid, Sr., 1862 August 10

 Item
Scope and Contents Written from VMI, Lexington, Virginia. Letter regards cadet life.

Letter to James Henry Reid, Sr., 1862 August 14

 Item
Scope and Contents Written from VMI, Lexington, Virginia. Letter regards cadet life, mentioning the cirriculum and the slang term "rat."

Letter to Jane A. Atwill (Broun), 1862 September 28

 Item
Scope and Contents Written from VMI, Lexington, Virginia. Letter regards family matters, cadet life, and an account of cadets stealing chickens from a local farmer in order to supplement the basic mess hall fare.

Letter to Jane Ann Atwill (Broun), 1862 September 28

 Digital Image
Identifier: https://digitalcollections.vmi.edu/digital/collection/p15821coll11/id/1069

Letter to John A. Langhorne, 1862 September 13

 Item
Scope and Contents Written from VMI, Lexington, Virginia. Letter regards cadet life.

Letter to John A. Langhorne, 1862 November 23

 Item
Scope and Contents Written from VMI, Lexington, Virginia. Letter regards cadet life.

Letter to John W. C. Watson, 1868 September 17

 Item
Scope and Contents Written from VMI, Lexington, Virginia. Edward M. Watson describes in detail the typical daily new cadet routine at VMI during the post-Civil War years. Topics include reveille, roll call, inspections, meals, study and recitation, drill and parade. The letter contains one of the earliest documented examples of term "rat" as a reference to a new cadet.